How Did It Come to This? Why Biden Is Mandating COVID Vaccines 

7 days ago

Super-contagious variant, political polarization and administration missteps lead to Biden COVID reboot  

Prince Andrew Receives Lawsuit Accusing Him of Sexual Abuse 

7 days ago

Andrew, 61, is one of the most prominent people linked to Jeffrey Epstein, charged by Manhattan federal prosecutors in July 2019 with sexually exploiting dozens of girls and women

Biden's pandemic plan overlooks mask mandates and vulnerable populations

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US Soccer Chief Vows to Equalize World Cup Payments in Gender Pay Dispute

7 days ago

The US men received $5.375 million for reaching the round of 16 at the 2014 World Cup, while the women received $1.725 million for winning the 2015 tournament

DOD Leaders Recall Americans' Resilience After 9/11 > U.S. Department of Defense > Defense Department News

by C. Todd Lopez, 7 days ago

At a 9/11 memorial event at the Pentagon, Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen H. Hicks said she remembers the resiliency of Americans following the attacks.

USGS Hazards Science ‚Äď Be Informed and Be Prepared

7 days ago

Every year, the United States experiences dozens, if not hundreds, of natural hazard events that can vary in size and impact ‚Äď some are incredibly large and affect people across several states and communities, and some are more localized impacting only a relatively small number of people. Regardless of the size or impact, every hazard event is unique, and each one provides an opportunity for USGS scientists to learn more about what causes them.¬†The more we know about hazards, the better we can find ways to help communities prepare for events, stay safe when they occur¬†and recover once they are over. ¬† USGS:¬† Start with Science The USGS works with many partners to monitor, assess, and conduct research on a wide range of natural hazards. USGS science provides policymakers, emergency managers, and the public the understanding needed to enhance family and community preparedness, response, and resilience. By identifying potential hazard scenarios and using USGS hazards science, federal, state, and local agencies can mitigate risk. For example, USGS science can be combined with population distribution to inform evacuation routes; local building and land-use codes to reduce impacts to critical facilities; emergency preparedness plans to ensure appropriate steps are taken before, during, and after an event. In addition, USGS science can inform large infrastructure investments ‚Äď such as dams and reservoirs ‚Äď and improvements to private property standards and materials, which all help to make homes and community structures more resilient to natural hazards. ¬† Earthquakes Earthquake hazards are a national risk, with nearly half of Americans living in areas prone to potentially damaging earthquakes. The USGS has created and provides¬†information and tools¬†to support earthquake loss reduction for the country. These include hazard assessments, earthquake scenarios like the annual ShakeOut events and the HayWired scenario, comprehensive real-time earthquake monitoring and public preparedness handbooks. Vehicles crushed beneath the second story balcony of the Hotel D'Haiti located in Port-au-Prince. This entire hotel with more than 50 rooms was destroyed as a result of the magnitude-7 earthquake that struck Haiti on Jan. 12, 2010. (Credit: Walter Mooney, USGS. Public domain.) Imagine if fire stations could be warned to open the firehouse doors before damaging seismic waves of an earthquake arrive; if emergency responders were provided a few moments of advance notice to act; if trains could be slowed or stopped; if water and other utilities could be notified to protect services; and people could have time to "drop, cover and hold on." The USGS and its partners are making that a reality by building an Earthquake Early Warning System¬†for the West Coast of the United States called ShakeAlert. As of Spring 2021, testing of public alerting via cell phones is now available in all three west coast states. The system aims to provide vital seconds of warning before the arrival of strong shaking, providing valuable time for response and protective actions by people and automated systems. ¬† Volcanoes The United States is home to 161 active volcanoes across numerous Western states and territories. Volcanoes can show signs of unrest hours, days and months before they erupt. The USGS operates five Volcano Observatories to learn how volcanoes work and to detect and interpret these eruption precursors as part of the¬†USGS National Volcano Early Warning System. By analyzing data from its monitoring networks, the¬†USGS issues public warnings and alerts¬†about potentially hazardous activity and current conditions at U.S. volcanoes, including forecasts of ashfall and notices of ash-forming eruptions to the aviation sector. The USGS works with emergency-management authorities well in advance of volcanic crises to raise the public‚Äôs awareness of volcanic hazards and to help potentially impacted communities prepare. Volcanic activity has been high this year, with low-level eruptions at Shishaldin continuing and unrest to low-level activity occurring at Cleveland and Semisopochnoi in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory continues to monitor Mauna Loa, which exhibited slightly elevated seismicity and deformation early in 2021, and post-eruptive changes at Kńęlauea on the Island of Hawai Ľi. Continuous monitoring of the Yellowstone volcanic system and its active hydrothermal areas continues. Some of the most noteworthy recent changes in Yellowstone include repeated eruptions of Steamboat Geyser ‚Äď the largest active geyser in the world.¬† Since reawakening in 2018, the geyser has erupted over 140 times, including 48 eruptions in 2019 and 2020 - records for a calendar year. During the first part of 2021, however, the geyser activity has waned, indicating that it will soon enter a period of quiescence. A wide view of Kńęlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, looking northwest. Pu‚Äėu ‚ÄėŇĆ‚ÄėŇć Crater, on Kńęlauea's East Rift Zone, is the large fuming crater just to the left of the image center. Just to the right of the center point, on the northeast flank of Pu‚Äėu ‚ÄėŇĆ‚ÄėŇć cone, smaller fume sources trace the lava tube supplying lava to the June 27th lava flow (the front of this flow is out of view to the right). In the distance, a faint plume of volcanic gas from the summit of Kńęlauea can be seen below the clouds. The broad slopes of Mauna Loa form the skyline. (Public domain.) Hurricanes Do you know how vulnerable your community is to hurricanes? As Hurricane Ida just demonstrated, those hazards go beyond the intense wind speeds and can include coastal erosion due to storm surge and waves, as well as inland flooding form extreme rainfall along its path. The USGS, working with federal, state, and local partners, provides comprehensive science and information that decision makers, emergency responders, resource managers, and communities can use to help them prepare for, cope with, and recover from a storm. USGS collects total water level (known to many as ‚Äústorm surge‚ÄĚ) and high-water mark data for major hurricanes or tropical storms affecting the United States. The data is accessible to the public in the USGS Flood Event Viewer.¬†In addition, the USGS assesses the likelihood of¬†beach erosion, overwash, or inundation. The USGS provides real-time assessments of impacts of approaching storms via the¬†Coastal Change Hazards Portal. This online tool allows anyone to interact with regularly updated forecasts of hurricane-induced coastal change, as well as ‚Äúsee‚ÄĚ past, present and future hazards along the coastline from local to national scales. Hurricane Ida, courtesy of NOAA. (Public domain.) Tsunamis The USGS studies recent and historic¬†tsunamis¬†to better understand impacts, processes, and causes, with a focus on investigating earthquakes as triggers.¬†USGS also studies landslide and volcanic eruption-triggered tsunamis to understand all potential causes and to identify tsunamis hazard zones.¬†Scientists have evaluated the number of people or businesses¬†exposed to tsunami hazards, as well as demographics and evacuation time for each of these communities. This provides officials with the ability to develop outreach, preparedness, and evacuation plans that are tailored to local conditions and needs. Animation of what a potential tsunami would look like generated from a large and hypothetical magnitude 9 subduction earthquake in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The height of the tsunami waves is exaggerated compared to the land surface. (Public domain.) Floods and Drought The USGS operates a nationwide streamgage network to monitor water level and flow in rivers and streams and compiles flood-frequency information needed to design dams, bridges and other infrastructure, as well as to delineate floodplains.¬†The same network provides data 24/7 to permit assessment of river flow conditions and for the National Weather Service flood forecasts, watches and warnings and the timing of flood-control reservoir retention or release of incoming flood waters to prevent downstream flooding. At the heart of USGS streamgaging operations are simple water-level/streamflow relations (rating curves) which permit the USGS to transform water-level data that can be easily monitored at each streamgage into the more complicated streamflow-volume data needed by forecasters and reservoir managers. Because these relations are functions of the stream channel, its size, shape, slope, and roughness, and because channels are greatly altered by flood flows, the USGS must maintain the ratings and keep them up to date.¬† Otherwise, the reliability of the river forecasts and reservoir operations will degrade. The USGS deploys stream hydrographers (scientists, engineers, and technicians trained in hydrography) to directly measure the flood flows and adjust the ratings during and after the flood.¬† Flooded house in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in Mantoloking, New Jersey (Public domain.) USGS science is also key to the¬†U.S. Drought Monitor¬†as well as the¬†Drought Outlook¬†led by NOAA‚Äôs National Weather Service. Both the USGS streamgage network and the USGS ground-water network provide much of the base data. On a global scale, the¬†Famine Early Warning Systems Network¬†identifies populations with the most food insecurity. This network is an activity of the U.S. Agency for International Development, with the USGS serving as an implementing partner. Drought in Pu'u Wa'awa'a State Forest Reserve (Credit: Elliot Parsons. Public domain.) Landslides and Sinkholes Landslides occur in all 50 states, and every year cause loss of life and billions of dollars in damage to public and private property (click to review recent landslide storymaps for more information). USGS science is helping assess¬†where, when, and how often landslides occur and how fast and far they might move. For burned areas where post-fire debris-flow are a hazard, the USGS delivers rapid assessments of debris-flow likelihood and size. These maps inform assessments by federal and state teams and are used by emergency and infrastructure organizations managing post-fire risks.¬†In many parts of the western US, the USGS partners with NOAA‚Äôs NWS to provide important advance warnings for debris-flows generated in areas burned by wildfire. View from an airplane looking at the Mud Creek landslide on the Big Sur coast that occurred May 20, 2017. (Public domain.) USGS is also working with state, federal, and academic partners to surveil the motion of large landslide above Barry Arm fjord in Prince William Sound Alaska and evaluate its potential to move rapidly into the fjord and generate a local tsunami. A recently released report describes simulations of rapid landslide motion, displacement of fjord water, and tsunami generation refining previous estimates and lowering the threat of catastrophic wave heights. About 20 percent of the nation is¬†at risk from sinkholes. These areas are underlain by karst, which is characterized by terrain where the underlying rock is easily dissolved by groundwater (check out more information on sinkholes at the USGS Water Science School). The¬†USGS produces geologic and subsurface maps¬†that help managers and others to better understand karst regions and identify local areas that may be susceptible. Cover-collapse sinkhole in limestone near Frederick, Maryland (September 2003). Many sinkholes occur along highways where rainwater runoff is concentrated into storm drains and ditches increasing the rate of sinkhole development (note the sewer drain pipe beneath roadway). (Credit: Randall Orndorff, USGS Eastern Geology and Paleoclimate Science Center. Public domain.) Wildfires The USGS provides tools and information before, during, and after fire disasters to identify wildfire risks and reduce subsequent hazards, including delivery to fire managers of up-to-the minute¬†maps and satellite imagery¬†about current wildfire extent, severity, and behavior. Burn severity maps are key input to post-fire debris flow assessments delivered to land and emergency managers shortly after damaging fires. USGS also provides technical and other assistance to wildfire incident management teams to aid response efforts.¬† Black Forest Fire, Colorado - Credit: USDA (Public domain.) Rising temperatures, decreased snowpack, and earlier snowmelt are expected to lead to longer fire seasons, drier fuel, and an increase in the area burned by wildfires in the future. With growing extent and severity of wildfires comes enhanced risk of damaging flooding and debris flows that can claim lives, damage infrastructure, affect water supply and quality, and impact ecosystem functions. Forest and rangeland managers therefore need information on how wildfire patterns and forests will change as the climate warms, in order to guide management activities that can sustain the important ecosystem services that forests provide ‚Äď including timber production, carbon storage, improved water quality, and recreational opportunities. ¬† Geomagnetic Storms Geomagnetic storms are caused by a dynamic interaction between the solar wind and the Earth‚Äôs magnetic field. The resulting rapid magnetic field fluctuations can interfere with radio communications, GPS systems, satellites, and directional drilling for oil and gas. Large magnetic storms can even interfere with the operations of electric power grids, causing blackouts. For these reasons, these storms are considered hazardous for both the economy and national security. Three perspectives on the events that create geomagnetic storms: A storm from the Sun, a global perspective of an auroral event as seen from space and aurora as seen from Earth. Researchers at NASA's Langley Research Center are using the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite to take new measurements of the E-region of the ionosphere - an active, charged layer that is crucial for the transmission of satellite, radio and GPS signals.¬† (Credit: SOHO Mission, NASA. Public domain.) The USGS operates a network of specially designed observatories that¬†provide real-time data on magnetic storm conditions. These data are critical for tracking the intensity of geomagnetic storms and are used by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center for issuing storm warnings, and likewise by the U.S. Air Force for their operations. Through the National Space Weather Program, USGS scientists are working with other federal government agencies and private industry to assess and mitigate hazardous effects of storms to the nation‚Äôs electric power grid. ¬† Preparedness Resources Get useful information and tools for preparing your family for hazards in your neighborhood, school, and workplace. FEMA‚Äôs Ready.gov website has ideas for creating emergency kits, activities for drills, group discussions, and exercises, and preparedness information specific to different hazards ranging from hurricanes to extreme heat. ¬† The Great ShakeOut on October 21 Millions of people across the nation will be participating in the next¬†ShakeOut¬†earthquake preparedness drill, to be held on Oct. 21, 2021. At 10:21 a.m. local time, participants will ‚Äúdrop, cover and hold on.‚ÄĚ Mark your calendar and¬†sign up¬†to join. ¬† Explore More About Hazards -¬†Knowing how hazards can impact your area helps keep you and your family safe.¬† Take a few minutes to click on the links below for more information and to sign up for applicable alerts to keep you informed at a moment‚Äôs notice. Coastal Hazards: See past, current and forecasted¬†hazards along the coasts. Space Weather: See¬†latest geomagnetic disturbance event¬†caused by solar activity. Floods: Gather info on current flooding and past incidents at the¬†USGS flood website. Drought: Browse through¬†statistics on water use¬†in the United States. Fire: See the¬†Fire Danger Forecast, which is a dynamic map updated daily (at the top right, click ‚Äúview legend for selected layer[s]‚ÄĚ to see what the colors mean). If you live near a recent wildfire, see maps showing the potential for¬†debris-flow activity. Wildlife die-off: Current and past¬†wildlife die-off information¬†is available online‚ÄĒthrough an interactive map‚ÄĒto help inform disease prevention and mitigation strategies. Tsunamis: An estimate of how long it would take for someone to travel by foot out of a tsunami-hazard zone can be calculated through the¬†USGS Pedestrian Evacuation Analyst. Earthquakes: See the¬†latest earthquakes¬†worldwide.¬† USGS Earthquakes Twitter Account Sinkholes:¬† See¬†areas that are most susceptible to sinkhole formation¬†in karst regions of the conterminous United States. Sign up for ‚ÄúThe Monitor‚ÄĚ ‚Äď the USGS Natural Hazards newsletter to stay current on all things concerning natural hazard science at the USGS. ¬† Sign Up for Alerts Volcanoes: Sign up¬†for free notification emails about volcanic activity happening at U.S. volcanoes. Water levels: See how high or low river levels are through USGS¬†WaterWatch. Receive texts or emails when water levels in rivers and streams exceed certain thresholds through USGS¬†WaterAlert. Or you can request data on-demand through¬†USGS¬†WaterNow. Earthquakes: Sign up to receive earthquake notices through the¬†USGS Earthquake Notification Service. Along with the regular USGS Facebook page, our USGS Natural Hazards Science Facebook page is a great way to keep up-to-date with natural hazards, related science, and how we are working to keep our nation aware and prepared.

Austin Says Philippines Is Vital Ally With Shared Goals > U.S. Department of Defense > Defense Department News

by David Vergun, 7 days ago

Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III hosted Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin N. Lorenzana at the Pentagon.

Wildfire burn scars can intensify and even create thunderstorms that lead to catastrophic flooding ‚Äď here's how it works

7 days ago

Hurricane Larry Expected to Hit Newfoundland Late Friday 

7 days ago

Tropical disturbance could bring heavy rain to Texas next week 

Hurricane Larry Expected to Hit Newfoundland Late Friday 

7 days ago

Tropical disturbance could bring heavy rain to Texas next week 

What are the ethics of getting a COVID-19 vaccine booster?

by Matt Shipman-NC State, 7 days ago

Are COVID-19 booster shots ethical considering the number of people around the world who haven't even gotten a first vaccination?

White House COVID-19 Response Team Defends Biden Plan

8 days ago

Panel cites evidence vaccine mandates work

Over-the-counter rapid antigen tests can help slow the spread of COVID-19 -- here's how to use them effectively

8 days ago

Skin healing gene tweaks may play a role in diabetic wounds

by UC Irvine, 8 days ago

Researchers have found a gene that's vital for healthy healing in the skin. The work could shed new light on diabetic ulcers and other non-healing wounds.

Weighing 3 factors could better personalize COPD treatment

by U. Zurich, 8 days ago

New research helps clarify the costs and benefits of different COPD treatments, which could help prevent unecessary side effects.

Over-the-counter rapid antigen tests for COVID-19 can help slow the spread of the delta variant -- here's when to use them

8 days ago

Denmark Lifts All COVID Curbs After Successful Vaccination Drive

8 days ago

Almost 87% of country's adults are fully vaccinated; almost 90% have had one dose

Guard Pilot Who Flew Over D.C. Following 9/11 Likened Attacks to Modern-Day Pearl Harbor > U.S. Department of Defense > Story

by C. Todd Lopez, 8 days ago

Two decades ago, Air Force Lt. Gen. Marc H. Sasseville, now the vice chief of the National Guard Bureau, was a lieutenant colonel with the D.C. Air National Guard. When aircraft hit the World Trade Center towers and the Pentagon, the nation went on alert ‚ÄĒ and so did he.

USGS Crews Work Fast to Capture Critical Flooding Measurements in the Mid-Atlantic

8 days ago

Five days¬†after Hurricane Ida made landfall, leaving behind¬†catastrophic¬†flooding and¬†significant¬†damage¬†in its path,¬†U.S. Geological Survey scientists¬†started¬†quickly¬†working¬†a multi-week effort to capture high-water mark¬†elevations¬†in¬†some of the¬†most impacted areas.¬†Teams from¬†USGS¬†water science centers in¬†New York,¬†New Jersey,¬†Pennsylvania, and Maryland¬†are¬†working together to¬†preserve, document, and survey elevations of¬†more than¬†200¬†combined¬†high-water marks¬†left¬†from¬†flooding caused by¬†Ida‚Äôs heavy rains.¬†¬† ‚ÄúWe are working with federal and state partners, along with the New York City mayor's office to coordinate our high-water mark collection effort in the hardest-hit communities of New York City,‚ÄĚ said¬†Ronald¬†Busciolano,¬†a¬†supervisory hydrologist¬†at the USGS New York Water Science Center.¬†¬†‚ÄúOur marks will provide ground-truth to other ongoing mapping efforts and be used by emergency managers to define the extent and depth of flooding in impacted areas, which decision-makers can use as they work to protect their communities from future flooding."¬† The¬†locations were assigned to the USGS with guidance from¬†the¬†Federal¬†Emergency¬†Management¬†Agency, National Weather¬†Service,¬†U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,¬†river basin commissions,¬†and¬†emergency management officials.¬†One hundred marks will be recorded in New York and 50 in New Jersey.¬†The Pennsylvania and¬†Maryland¬†crews¬†will record¬†75 and 33¬†locations respectively¬†in southeastern and central Pennsylvania and northern Maryland. fullscreen ¬† The USGS experts are looking for telltale lines of seeds, leaves, grass blades and other debris left behind on buildings, bridges, other structures, and even tree trunks as floodwaters recede. Once they find these high-water marks, they label them, photograph them, survey them, and record crucial details about them. The physical signs of flooding provide valuable information that can confirm or correct other lines of evidence.¬† High water mark campaigns, coupled with stream and flood measurements,¬†provides¬†a more complete picture of storm impacts.¬†¬† In¬†New Jersey, deadly flooding¬†impacted areas¬†from¬†the western edge along the Delaware River¬†to the east and¬†northeast,¬†setting new¬†peak¬†streamflow¬†records¬†at¬†streamgages¬†in¬†Princeton,¬†Ridgewood, and¬†Elizabeth,¬†New¬†Jersey. In¬†total, about¬†12¬†USGS¬†streamgages¬†recorded new¬†period-of-record¬†flood peaks,¬†and an¬†additional¬†¬†10¬†streamgages¬†came close¬†to equaling or exceeding the current peaks of record.¬†In¬†Pennsylvania,¬†¬†at least¬†14¬†streamgages¬†recorded the highest peaks¬†of record, most of which were in and around¬†the¬†Philadelphia¬†area.¬†¬† The¬†peak streamflow¬†recorded¬†at these USGS¬†streamgages¬†will be¬†used to update¬†previously¬†computed flood frequencies. Flood frequency analysis¬†is used to¬†estimate¬†the magnitude¬†of¬†floods,¬†¬†which helps inform decisions¬†on¬†the appropriate¬†design criteria for¬†bridges¬†and¬†roads,¬†and¬†with¬†flood-plain management, among other things.¬†¬† ‚ÄúIn addition to¬†collecting¬†high-water marks and¬†streamgage¬†measurements,¬†the USGS Pennsylvania Water Science Center also deployed six storm sensors in and around Paxton Creek in Harrisburg in advance of the storm,‚ÄĚ said¬†Marla Stuckey,¬†a¬†hydrologist at the center. ‚ÄúThis data will provide flood elevation data to help determine the extent of flooding.‚Ä̬†¬† Hydrographer John Trainor making a high-water ADCP discharge measurement at 01400500 Raritan River at Manville, NJ. (Credit: Nicole Donato, USGS. Public domain.) The USGS¬†has thousands of real-time water-monitoring sites throughout the nation that record continuous stream stage (height of a river) and streamflow (how much water is flowing). This network of¬†streamgages¬†is invaluable during floods and high water to allow the general public and emergency responders to know where dangerous flooding might be occurring.¬† The¬†USGS‚Äôs¬†early information from¬†streamgages¬†and¬†high-water marks can help emergency managers¬†see areas hardest hit by flooding, helping them make informed decisions on¬†issues ranging from evacuation routes to¬†where to locate relief centers so that aid can reach the most severely affected communities quickly. The information¬†can help the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manage flood control.¬† The fieldwork is expected to continue for the next several weeks and¬†will¬†help¬†FEMA¬†to discern the difference between wind and water damage ‚Äď important information for property owners and insurers. Over the long term, it can help emergency managers plan better for future floods; improve the computer models used by the National Weather Service to forecast flooding; provide information used by FEMA to update the nationwide flood zone maps that underpin the federal flood insurance program.¬†Data will be available on the¬†USGS Flood Event Viewer.¬† Hydrographer Chris Witzigman making a high-water ADCP discharge measurement near Millstone River at Millstone, NJ.¬†(Credit: John Trainor, USGS. Public domain.)

COVID long-haulers face higher risk of severe kidney disease

by Kristina Sauerwein-Washington University, 8 days ago

People who had COVID-19, even those with mild cases, are at an increased risk of developing kidney damage as well as chronic and end-stage kidney diseases.

NASA to Discuss First Rock Sample Collected on Mars

8 days ago

Perseverance rover gathered sample earlier this week and conducted preliminary analysis

Skeletal embrace sheds light on love and burial in ancient China

by Caitlin Clark-Texas AM, 8 days ago

The burial of two 1,500-year-old skeletons in an embrace offers a look into the attitudes about love and the afterlife during China's North Wei Dynasty.

Gene helps put stripes and blotches on cats of all sizes

by Hanae Armitage-Stanford, 8 days ago

New research on cat fur patterns links a specific gene to the stripes, blotches, and spots on domestic cats and their large wild relatives.

American Muslims are at high risk of suicide -- 20 years post-9/11, the links between Islamophobia and suicide remain unexplored

8 days ago

How 'engagement' makes you vulnerable to manipulation and misinformation on social media

8 days ago

Raducanu, Fernandez Set Up Battle of Teens in U.S. Open Final

8 days ago

It will also mark the first Grand Slam final to be contested by two teenagers since the 1999 U.S. Open between Serena Williams and Martina Hingis

Raducanu, Fernandez Set Up Battle of Teens in U.S. Open Final

8 days ago

It will also mark the first Grand Slam final to be contested by two teenagers since the 1999 U.S. Open between Serena Williams and Martina Hingis

SpaceX Inspiration4 mission will send 4 people with minimal training into orbit ‚Äď and bring space tourism closer to reality

8 days ago

Student loan debt is crushing Americans ‚Äď 4 essential reads

8 days ago

How bans on mask mandates affect students with disabilities ‚Äď 4 questions answered

8 days ago

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